Telecom

The Contours of A Mobile World

ITU has released its latest ICT indicators database for June 2014. This is updated with 2013 numbers for most indicators.

According to the data, global mobile subscriptions will be just short of 7 billion mark in 2014, standing at 6.9 billion. The total mobile subscriptions in 2013 stood at 6.6 billion.

That is as many as 93.1 mobiles per every 100 inhabitants. The figure will go up to 95.5 in 2014, according to ITU.

A little analysis reveals interesting insights.

  • Among the ten countries with highest mobile subscriptions base, six are in Asia.
  • Top ten countries account for 58% of the total mobile subscriptions
  • Chinese regions (China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macao) and the Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan and Maldives) together account for 37% of the world’s mobile subscriptions. 
  • The world has 32 mobile broadband connections for 100 inhabitants. The developed-developing country divide is significant here. In the developed world, the figure stands at 83.7 while in the developing world, it stands at just 21.1.

Here are some important figures regarding mobile telephony.

Growth in global mobile subscriptions continues, with no signs of either slowing down or accelerating.

The mobile densities across countries vary significantly, though. Here is a world map depicting number of mobile subscriptions per 100 inhabitants. Those with dark red have the lowest density and those with dark green have the highest density of mobile subscribers.  Just hover over the country to get the absolute value.

However, two countries are dominant leaders: China and India. With Indonesia almost catching up with the USA, it is a matter of few months before the three largest mobile countries would be in Asia.

Some countries have seen significant growth during the last 12 years, when the world changed to a mobile world. Here is a list of countries which recorded the maximum growth between 2001 to 2013.

And this is how the mobile density of world’s largest emerging economies (BRICS) grew.

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